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Creating a NexThink uninstaller for deployment via Jamf Pro

December 4, 2022 Leave a comment

As a follow-up to my previous post on building an installer for NexThink Collector which could be deployed via Jamf Pro, I also needed to build an uninstaller for this software. Fortunately, NexThink ships an uninstaller script on the same disk image that it uses to ship its installer.

Screenshot 2022 12 03 at 3 31 46 PM

NexThink’s install documentation for the macOS version of the Collector software assumes that a human is doing the following to run the uninstall process:

A. Mounting the disk image
B. Opening the Terminal application
C. Using the uninstaller script to run the uninstallation process.

Screenshot 2022 12 03 at 3 47 10 PM

In my case, I decided to do the following to deploy the uninstaller via Jamf Pro:

  1. Wrap the disk image inside a separate installer package.
  2. Use a postinstall script to perform the following actions:

A. Identify the location of the disk image stored inside the installer package.
B. Mount the disk image
C. Use the uninstall script to uninstall the NexThink Collector software.
D. Unmount the disk image.

For more details, please see below the jump.

Read more…

Creating a NexThink installer for deployment via Jamf Pro

December 3, 2022 Leave a comment

A while back, I had to build an installer for NexThink Collector which could be deployed via Jamf Pro. NexThink can be interesting to deploy because the installation process:

  1. Involves an application named csi.app, which has a command line tool.
  2. The referenced csi app’s command line tool configures and runs an installer package.
  3. The command line tool also needs to reference a license file, which NexThink refers to as a CustomerKey file.

The CustomerKey file should look similar to what’s shown below:


—–BEGIN CUSTOMER KEY—–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—–END CUSTOMER KEY—–

All the needed components with the exception of the CustomerKey file, which is different for each customer, ship on a disk image.

Screenshot 2022 12 02 at 3 31 46 PM

NexThink’s install documentation for the macOS version of the Collector software assumes that a human is doing one of the following:

Graphical installation: Mounting the disk image, double-clicking on the installer package and following the prompts, entering the correct configuration information were needed.

Screenshot 2022 12 02 at 3 46 29 PM

 

Screenshot 2022 12 02 at 3 46 39 PM

Command line installation: Mounting the disk image, opening the Terminal application and using the csi app’s command line tool to configure the installer package and run the installation process.

Screenshot 2022 12 02 at 3 46 53 PM

 

Screenshot 2022 12 02 at 3 47 02 PM

 

For the Enterprise Deployment section of the application, the NexThink documentation says they support it but doesn’t provide information on how to do it.

Screenshot 2022 12 02 at 3 47 10 PM

In my case, I decided to do the following to deploy it via Jamf Pro:

  1. Wrap the disk image and CustomerKey file inside a separate installer package.
  2. Use a postinstall script to perform the following actions:

A. Identify the location of the disk image stored inside the installer package.
B. Mount the disk image
C. Identify the location of the csi.app on the mounted disk image.
D. Identify the location of the CustomerKey file stored inside the installer package.
E. Use the csi app’s command line tool to configure and run the NexThink-provided installer package on the mounted disk image, to install the NexThink Collector software.
F. Unmount the disk image.

For more details, please see below the jump.

Read more…

autopkg-conductor updated to support reporting to Slack and Microsoft Teams

November 19, 2022 Leave a comment

When the autopkg-conductor tool was first written, one of its primary functions was to send the output of JSSImporter to a Slack channel. With JSSImporter being deprecated in favor of JamfUploader, I’ve decided to do the following:

  1. Drop support for JSSImporter.
  2. Add additional reporting options for JamfUploader.

As of the current version to the tool, autopkg-conductor can send output from JamfUploader to the following:

For more details, please see below the jump.

Read more…

Downloading macOS IPSW files for use with Mac virtual machines on Apple Silicon Macs

November 17, 2022 Leave a comment

A change between creating Mac virtual machines on Intel Macs and creating them on Apple Silicon Macs is that virtualization on Apple Silicon Macs often assumes that the virtual machine is built using a macOS restore image . These restore images are files with an .ipsw file extension and are commonly referred to as IPSW files.

Apple publishes the download links for macOS restore images via the following URL:

https://mesu.apple.com/assets/macos/com_apple_macOSIPSW/com_apple_macOSIPSW.xml

If you look at the XML file from the link above, it provides download links for the current version of macOS for the various Mac models which support running that version of macOS.

Among the various models listed is the model identifier for Mac virtual machines (VirtualMac2,1) created using Apple’s Virtualization framework. This means that we should be able to identify and download the appropriate IPSW file for use when building Mac virtual machines.

Screenshot 2022-11-16 at 7.33.48 PM

Using this information, I’ve written a script to download the appropriate IPSW file for building macOS virtual machines by checking the file linked above for the download URL associated with the VirtualMac2,1 Mac model. For more details, please see below the jump.

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Creating AWS S3 buckets for webpage redirection

October 18, 2022 Leave a comment

I recently had an issue where I needed to solve a particular problem:

1. I had a DNS domain name

dns.name.here

2. I needed to point it to a HTTPS URL hosted on another domain:

https://other.dns.name.here/path/to/site/goes/here

3. The DNS server for dns.name.here does not support HTTP Redirect records.

To address this, I decided to use S3 buckets hosted on Amazon Web Services to handle the redirection to the HTTPS URL. In this scenario, what I’m doing is pointing the relevant dns.name.here domain name at the S3 bucket’s AWS domain name. The S3 bucket is performing a HTTP 301 redirect, which sends the requesting web browser the URL of the site I want to connect to. For those interested, Amazon’s documentation of how to use an S3 bucket for URL redirection is linked below:

https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AmazonS3/latest/userguide/how-to-page-redirect.html

After doing it the first time manually, I decided to see if anyone had scripted this task. It turns out the answer is “no”, at least for what I wanted to do, so I’ve written a script which handles this task. For more details, please see below the jump.

Read more…

Using the Jamf Pro API to report on Self Service policies

October 14, 2022 2 comments

Every so often, it may be necessary to generate a report from Jamf Pro of which policies are available in Self Service. To assist with this task, I’ve written a script which uses the Jamf Pro Classic API to search through the policy records and generate a report in .tsv format.

For more details, please see below the jump.

Read more…

Running Jamf Pro inventory updates at startup time

October 9, 2022 2 comments

With the release of macOS Ventura expected this month, an important topic to many Mac admins is having their systems management tools detect as quickly as possible which of their Macs have upgraded to macOS Ventura. The reasons for this are varied, but one particular reason is to get configuration profiles deployed as soon as possible to manage new features and functionality in macOS Ventura.

One way to ensure quick detection if you’re using Jamf Pro is to have your managed Macs submit an inventory update to the Jamf Pro server when the Mac starts up. For one way to do this, please see below the jump.

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Microsoft Defender tamper protection status detection for Jamf Pro

September 13, 2022 Leave a comment

As a follow-up to my earlier post about working with Microsoft Defender’s tamper protection, I’ve written an Extension Attribute for Jamf Pro which detects and reports on Defender’s tamper protection status. For more details, please see below the jump.

Read more…

Categories: Jamf Pro, Scripting

Payload-Free Package Creator 2.4 now available

April 3, 2022 Leave a comment

Payload-Free Package Creator.app, an Automator application that allows the selection of an existing script and then create a payload-free package that runs the selected script, has been updated to version 2.4.

The functionality and operations of the app have not changed from Payload-Free Package Creator 2.3. The main change is that Payload-Free Package Creator.app is now a Universal app, allowing it to run natively on both Intel and Apple Silicon Macs.

Payload-Free Package Creator 2.4, along with all components and scripts, are available on GitHub via the link below:

https://github.com/rtrouton/Payload-Free-Package-Creator

Simple Package Creator 1.5 now available

April 2, 2022 Leave a comment

Simple Package Creator.app, an Automator application that will allow the selection of a self-contained application and creates an installer package that enables the installation of the application with pre-set permissions into /Applications, has been updated to version 1.5.

The functionality and operations of the app have not changed from Simple Package Creator 1.4. The main change is that Simple Package Creator.app is now a Universal app, allowing it to run natively on both Intel and Apple Silicon Macs.

Simple Package Creator 1.5, along with all components and scripts, are available on GitHub via the link below:

https://github.com/rtrouton/Simple-Package-Creator

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