Session videos and slides available from MacSysAdmin 2018

October 11, 2018 Leave a comment

The documentation from MacSysAdmin 2018 is available, with the session slides and videos being accessible from the link below:

http://documentation.macsysadmin.se

The video of my session is available for download from here:

I also like to thank Tycho Sjögren and Apoio AB for inviting me to speak again at this year’s MacSysAdmin.

Building an SAP GUI installer for macOS

October 11, 2018 1 comment

Since I’ve started working for my current employer, my colleagues and I have occasionally received the following question from various Mac admins:

“I’m using SAP in my environment. How do I deploy the Mac software for SAP?”

When we’ve followed up for more details, the “Mac software for SAP” usually means the SAP GUI software. SAP GUI comes in two flavors:

SAP GUI for Java supports the following operating systems:

  • openSUSE
  • Fedora
  • macOS
  • Microsoft Windows
  • AIX
  • Ubuntu

The SAP GUI for Java is what’s available for macOS, so how to get it and deploy it? For more details, please see below the jump.

Read more…

Slides from the “Getting Started with Amazon Web Services” session at MacSysAdmin 2018

October 5, 2018 2 comments

For those who wanted a copy of my Amazon Web Services talk at at the MacSysAdmin 2018 conference, here are links to the slides in PDF and Keynote format.

PDF – http://tinyurl.com/MSA2018AWSPDF

Keynote – http://tinyurl.com/MSA2018AWSKeynote

Phantom groups, MySQL queries and Jamf Pro 10.7

September 19, 2018 2 comments

On September 13th, Jamf released a new KBase article for Jamf Pro customers who hosted Jamf Pro themselves instead of hosting in Jamf Cloud:

On-Prem Jamf Pro Customers Upgrading to 10.7.0: https://www.jamf.com/jamf-nation/articles/552/on-prem-jamf-pro-customers-upgrading-to-10-7-0

In the KBase article, Jamf provides a couple of MySQL commands to run:

select computer_group_id,criteria,criteria_display from smart_computer_group_criteria where criteria not in (select computer_group_name from computer_groups) and search_field="Computer Group";
select computer_group_id,criteria,criteria_display from smart_computer_group_criteria where binary criteria not in (select binary computer_group_name from computer_groups) and search_field="Computer Group";

If either query returned data, the KBase directs you to contact Jamf Support. This was my output:

What had happened? For more details, please see below the jump.

Read more…

Categories: AutoPkg, Jamf Pro, JSSImporter

Creating Privacy Preferences Policy Control profiles for macOS

August 31, 2018 3 comments

As part of the pre-release announcements about macOS Mojave, Apple released the following KBase article:

Prepare your institution for iOS 12 or macOS Mojave:

https://support.apple.com/HT209028

Screen Shot 2018 08 31 at 2 38 58 PM

As part of the KBase article, Apple included a Changes introduced in macOS Mojave section which featured this note:

You can allow apps to access certain files used for system administration, and to allow access to application data. For example, if an app requests access to your Calendar data, you can allow or deny the request. MDM administrators can manage these requests using the Privacy Preferences Policy Control payload, as documented in the Configuration Profile Reference.

Screen Shot 2018 08 31 at 2 39 12 PM

What’s all this mean? For more details, see below the jump.

Read more…

Using directory membership to manage Apple Remote Desktop permissions

August 22, 2018 3 comments

Apple Remote Desktop (ARD) is a screen sharing and remote administration tool that just about every Mac admin uses at some point. Configuring access permissions for it can be done in several ways:

  1. Using System Preferences’ Sharing preference pane to configure the Remote Management settings.
  2. Using the kickstart command line utility to grant permissions to all or specified users
  3. Using the kickstart command line utility to grant permissions to members of specified directories.

The last item may be the least-known method of assigning permissions, but it can be the most powerful because it allows ARD’s management agent to be configured once then use group membership to assign ARD permissions. For more details, please see below the jump.

Read more…

The T2 Macs, the end of NetBoot and deploying from macOS Recovery

August 15, 2018 9 comments

In late 2017, Apple released the iMac Pro. Along with the new Secure Enclave protection provided by Apple’s T2 chip, the iMac Pro brought another notable development: It did not support booting from a network volume, otherwise known as NetBoot.

The one exception was Apple’s Internet Recovery, where Apple is providing a NetBoot-like service to provide access to macOS Recovery. The iMac Pro is still able to boot to Internet Recovery, which provides a way to repair the Mac or reinstall the operating system in situations where the Mac’s own Recovery volume is missing or not working properly.

With NetBoot not being available for the iMac Pro but still available for other models, it wasn’t yet clear if NetBoot-based workflows for setting up new Macs or rebuilding existing ones were on the way out. However, Apple’s release of of T2-equipped MacBook Pros in July 2018 which also could not use NetBoot has made Apple’s direction clear. As Apple releases new Mac models equipped with T2 chips and Secure Enclave, it is unlikely that these future Mac releases will be supporting NetBoot.

Screen Shot 2018 08 15 at 10 23 19 AM

For Mac admins using NetBoot-based workflows to set up their Macs, what are the alternatives? Apple has been encouraging the use of Apple’s Device Enrollment Program, which leverages a company, school or institutions’ mobile device management (MDM) service. In this case, you would need to arrange with Apple or an Apple reseller to purchase Macs that are enrolled in your organization’s DEP.

When a DEP-enrolled Mac is started for the first time (or started after an OS reinstall), it is automatically configured to use your organizations’ MDM service and the device checks in with the MDM service. The MDM service then configures the Mac as desired with your organization’s software and configuration settings. A good example of what this process may look like can be seen here.

What if you don’t have DEP, or you don’t have MDM? In that case, you may still be able to leverage Recovery-based deployment methods, which would allow you install the desired software and configuration settings onto the Mac’s existing OS, or install a new OS along with software and configuration settings. For more details on these methods, please see below the jump.

Read more…

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