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Archive for the ‘Jamf Pro Classic API’ Category

Session videos from Jamf Nation User Conference 2022 now available

December 1, 2022 Leave a comment

Jamf has posted the session videos for Jamf Nation User Conference 2022, including the video for my Running Jamf Pro at Scale, from SAP with ❤️ session.

For those interested, all of the the JNUC 2022 session videos are available on YouTube. For convenience, I’ve linked my session here.

Using the Jamf Pro API to report on Self Service policies

October 14, 2022 2 comments

Every so often, it may be necessary to generate a report from Jamf Pro of which policies are available in Self Service. To assist with this task, I’ve written a script which uses the Jamf Pro Classic API to search through the policy records and generate a report in .tsv format.

For more details, please see below the jump.

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Building Jamf Pro smart groups for Ventura-compatible and Ventura-incompatible Mac models

October 12, 2022 7 comments

As part of preparing for macOS Ventura, it may be useful to have a way to easily distinguish between the Macs in your fleet which can run macOS Ventura and those which can’t. Apple has published the following list of Macs which are compatible with Ventura, which will help with both identitying the compatible Mac models as well as the incompatible Mac models.

  • iMac: 2017 and later models
  • iMac Pro: All models
  • MacBook: 2017 and later models
  • MacBook Pro: 2017 and later models
  • MacBook Air: 2018 and later models
  • Mac Mini: 2018 or later models
  • Mac Pro: 2019 or later models
  • Mac Studio: All models

From there, here’s the list of Mac models which are compatible with macOS Ventura:


Mac13,1
Mac13,2
Mac14,2
Mac14,7
MacBook10,1
MacBookAir10,1
MacBookAir8,1
MacBookAir8,2
MacBookAir9,1
MacBookPro14,1
MacBookPro14,2
MacBookPro14,3
MacBookPro15,1
MacBookPro15,2
MacBookPro15,3
MacBookPro15,4
MacBookPro16,1
MacBookPro16,2
MacBookPro16,3
MacBookPro16,4
MacBookPro17,1
MacBookPro18,1
MacBookPro18,2
MacBookPro18,3
MacBookPro18,4
MacPro7,1
Macmini8,1
Macmini9,1
VirtualMac2,1
iMac18,1
iMac18,2
iMac18,3
iMac19,1
iMac19,2
iMac20,1
iMac20,2
iMac21,1
iMac21,2
iMacPro1,1
iSim1,1

We can use this information to build smart groups which can help identify which Macs are compatible with Ventura and which are not. For more details, see below the jump:

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Backing up Self Service icon graphic files from Jamf Pro

January 12, 2022 Leave a comment

While working with Self Service policies on Jamf Pro, I prefer to download the graphic files used for the Self Service icons and back them up to GitHub or a similar internal source control tool. The reasons I do this are the following:

  1. I have an off-server backup for the graphic files.
  2. I can track changes to the Self Service policy icons.

To help me manage this, I have a script which does the following:

  1. Use the Jamf Pro Classic API to identify which policies are Self Service policies with icons.
  2. Download each Self Service icon’s graphic file using the URI for each file.
  3. Save the downloaded graphics file to a specified download directory, using a filename format like shown below:

policy_name_here-jamf_pro_policy_id_here-graphics_file_name_here

As part of the download process, any spaces are removed from the graphic file’s file names and the policy names. Any colons ( : ) are likewise replaced with dashes ( ) to prevent problems for the macOS filesystem.

For more details, please see below the jump.

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Identifying Intel Macs with Secure Enclave using Jamf Pro

January 7, 2022 2 comments

Identifying Intel Macs with Secure Enclave using Jamf Pro

As part of a recent task, I needed to identify using Jamf Pro which Macs in our environment have Secure Enclave and which Macs do not. For Intel Macs, having Secure Enclave means that you have one of the following Macs:

Macs with the Apple T1 Security Chip

  • MacBook Pro (13-inch with Touch Bar, Late 2016)
  • MacBook Pro (15-inch with Touch Bar, Late 2016)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch with Touch Bar, Mid-2017)
  • MacBook Pro (15-inch with Touch Bar, Mid-2017)

Macs with the Apple T2 Security Chip

  • iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, 2020)
  • iMac Pro
  • Mac Pro (2019)
  • Mac Pro (Rack, 2019)
  • Mac mini (2018)
  • MacBook Air (Retina, 13-inch, 2020)
  • MacBook Air (Retina, 13-inch, 2019)
  • MacBook Air (Retina, 13-inch, 2018)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2020, Two Thunderbolt 3 ports)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2020, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)
  • MacBook Pro (16-inch, 2019)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2019, Two Thunderbolt 3 ports)
  • MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2019)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2019, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)
  • MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2018)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2018, Four Thunderbolt 3 ports)

Jamf Pro doesn’t have a specific “this Mac has Secure Enclave” inventory identifier, so I decided to use Apple’s documentation on which Intel Mac models have Secure Enclave to build Jamf Pro smart groups with model identifiers. With Apple’s move to Apple Silicon processors, this list of models should not be added to in the future.

For Intel Macs equipped with T1 chips, here are the relevant model identifiers:


MacBookPro13,2
MacBookPro13,3
MacBookPro14,2
MacBookPro14,3

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gistfile1.txt

hosted with ❤ by GitHub

For Intel Macs equipped with T2 chips, here are the relevant model identifiers:


iMac20,1
iMacPro1,1
MacPro7,1
Macmini8,1
MacBookAir8,1
MacBookAir8,2
MacBookAir9,1
MacBookPro15,1
MacBookPro15,2
MacBookPro15,3
MacBookPro15,4
MacBookPro16,1
MacBookPro16,2
MacBookPro16,3
MacBookPro16,4

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gistfile1.txt

hosted with ❤ by GitHub

For more details, please see below the jump.

Read more…

Updated script for obtaining, checking and renewing Bearer Tokens for the Classic and Jamf Pro APIs

January 5, 2022 8 comments

Following my earlier posts on obtaining, checking and renewing Bearer Tokens for the Jamf Pro API and the deprecation of Basic Authentication for the Jamf Pro Classic API, @bryson3gps reached out to let me know there was a simpler way to get the Bearer Token which didn’t require the prior encoding of the username and password credentials in base64 format.

The command shown below will handle obtaining the token using Basic Authentication on macOS Monterey and later:


curl -X POST -u username:password -s https://server.name.here/api/v1/auth/token | plutil -extract token raw –

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gistfile1.txt

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The command shown below will handle obtaining the token using Basic Authentication on macOS Big Sur and earlier:


curl -X POST -u username:password -s https://server.name.here/api/v1/auth/token | python -c 'import sys, json; print json.load(sys.stdin)["token"]'

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gistfile1.txt

hosted with ❤ by GitHub

This allows the following functions to be collapsed into one command:

  • Encoding the username and password in base64 format
  • Obtaining a Bearer Token using Basic Authentication
  • Storing the Bearer Token (if command is used in a variable.)

He also pointed out that I was using an incorrect API call for the validation check which uses HTTP status codes. What I had:


/usr/bin/curl –write-out %{http_code} –silent –output /dev/null "${jamfpro_url}/api/v1/auth/keep-alive" –request POST –header "Authorization: Bearer ${api_token}"

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gistfile1.txt

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While this worked, it was using the keepalive endpoint with a POST request, which is used to invalidate tokens and issue new ones. I’ve updated to use this instead:


/usr/bin/curl –write-out %{http_code} –silent –output /dev/null "${jamfpro_url}/api/v1/auth" –request GET –header "Authorization: Bearer ${api_token}"

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gistfile1.txt

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This API call sends a GET request to the auth endpoint, which returns all the authorization details associated with the current Bearer Token. This will work for the validation check and won’t trigger accidental invalidation of the existing Bearer Token.

With this in mind, the process of obtaining Bearer Tokens is now simplified. This affects the deprecation of the Classic API for Jamf Pro 10.35.0 and later by changing the workflow from this:

Screen shot 2022 01 04 at 5 09 20 pm

To this:

Screen Shot 2022 01 05 at 9 43 06 AM

I’ve incorporated these changes into an updated script with functions for obtaining, checking and renewing Bearer Tokens for the Classic (for Jamf Pro 10.35.0 and later) and Jamf Pro APIs. For more details, please see below the jump.

Read more…

Basic Authentication deprecated for the Jamf Pro Classic API

January 4, 2022 7 comments

As part of the release of Jamf Pro 10.35, the following note was added to the Deprecations and Removals section of the Jamf Pro 10.35.0 Release Notes:

Basic authentication — Jamf will discontinue support for Basic authentication in the Classic API in a future release of Jamf Pro (estimated removal date: August-December 2022) for enhanced security. Jamf will provide additional information at a later date. To disable Basic authentication before support is removed, contact Jamf Support via Jamf Account.

Screen Shot 2022 01 04 at 11 54 23 AM

To help folks prepare for this change, as of Jamf Pro 10.35.0, both Basic Authentication and using Bearer Tokens generated by the Jamf Pro API can be used for Jamf Pro Classic API authentication. This is noted in the New Features and Enhancements section of the Jamf Pro 10.35.0 release notes:

You can now use the Classic API to authenticate using Basic authentication or a Bearer Token retrieved through the /v1/auth/token Jamf Pro API endpoint for enhanced security. For information on Bearer Token authentication, see the Jamf developer resources: https://developer.jamf.com/jamf-pro/docs/classic-api-authentication-changes

Screen Shot 2022 01 04 at 11 54 52 AM

For more details, please see below the jump.

Read more…

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