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Archive for the ‘Jamf Pro’ Category

Installing and configuring the Jamf Infrastructure Manager on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

April 29, 2017 1 comment

I recently needed to configure Jamf’s Jamf Infrastructure Manager (JIM) to provide a way for a Jamf Pro server hosted outside a company’s network to be able to talk to an otherwise inaccessible Active Directory domain.

The documentation on how to set up an Infrastructure Manager covers the essentials of how to do it, but doesn’t include any screenshots or have information about how to access the logs to help debug problems. After some research and working with the JIM a bit, I was able to figure out the basics. For more details, see below the jump.

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Categories: Casper, Jamf Pro, JSS, Linux

S3 server side encryption not supported with Jamf Pro cloud distribution points

April 23, 2017 Leave a comment

As part of a project I’m working on, I needed to set up a cloud distribution point for a Jamf Pro server in Amazon Web Services. AWS -hosted cloud distribution points use a bucket in Amazon’s S3 service to store the files hosted by the distribution point. To help secure the S3 bucket, I enabled S3 server-side encryption. This encryption provides data at rest protection for files stored in a S3 bucket and is managed by Amazon’s S3 service.

Once that security was enabled, I was unable to then upload either installer .pkgs or .dmgs to the S3 bucket associated with the cloud distribution point using any of the following methods:

The unusual part was that the installer would look like it would upload and appear as a valid package when viewed from the Jamf Pro web console.

Screen Shot 2017 04 23 at 12 19 02 PM

Screen Shot 2017 04 23 at 12 19 23 PM

However, if I viewed the S3 bucket from the AWS console, the actual installer files would not be present in the S3 bucket.

Encrypted CDP S3 bucket

For more details, see below the jump.

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Identifying which Active Directory account is logged into Enterprise Connect

April 12, 2017 4 comments

As more Mac environments move away from binding Macs to Active Directory and using AD mobile accounts, and towards using local accounts in combination of tools like NoMAD and Apple’s Enterprise Connect, it’s become more challenging to identify which people are logged into which computers. While mobile Active Directory accounts will use the username and password of the person’s AD account, there is no such certainty with local user accounts.

Fortunately, my colleague Joe Chilcote recently let me know that it’s possible to query the logged-in user’s login keychain and get the username of the Active Directory account which is logged into Enterprise Connect. This can be accomplished by running the following command as the logged-in user:

/usr/bin/security find-generic-password -l "Enterprise Connect" $HOME/Library/Keychains/login.keychain | awk -F "=" '/acct/ {print $2}' | tr -d "\""

That should produce output similar to that shown below:

computername:~ username$ /usr/bin/security find-generic-password -l "Enterprise Connect" $HOME/Library/Keychains/login.keychain | awk -F "=" '/acct/ {print $2}' | tr -d "\""
AD_username_here
computername:~ username$

It’s also possible to leverage this technique to update the User and Location section of a particular computer managed by a Jamf Pro server. For more information, see below the jump.

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Running multiple Jamf Pro policies via custom trigger

April 8, 2017 2 comments
Categories: Casper, Jamf Pro, Scripting

Running all Jamf Pro policies in a specified category via the API

April 6, 2017 2 comments

As part of a project I’m working on, I need to run several policies from a Jamf Pro server using a script which is using the Jamf Pro agent to run policies. However, I also want to maintain maximum flexibility and retain the ability to add, remove or change policies as required without needing to change the script.

My colleague Marc provided a solution for this by letting me know that it was possible to use the Jamf Pro API to pull down a list of policies associated with a specific category and then running those policies in the order provided by the API. For more details, see below the jump.

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Categories: Casper, Jamf Pro, Scripting

Creating a Jamf Pro Cloud Distribution Point using Amazon Web Services

March 7, 2017 3 comments

In a number of environments, Mac admins are transitioning from hosting their Mac-supporting services in on-site datacenters to now hosting them with various cloud service providers. These service providers can include Jamf Cloud, Amazon Web Services, Akamai or Rackspace.

For Mac admins using Jamf Pro, one way to start this transition is to use a Cloud Distribution Point (CDP). This allows a Jamf Pro server to use several specific cloud services’ content delivery networks to host installers and (if applicable) in-house developed applications and eBooks.

For my own needs, I was looking into setting up a CDP on Amazon Web Services (AWS). Jamf provides some documentation on how to set a CDP up with AWS, but doesn’t provide specific guidance. After some research and testing though, I was able to figure out the process for Jamf Pro 9.97x. For more details, see below the jump.

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Providing access to Apple software updates from Jamf Pro’s Self Service

February 26, 2017 Leave a comment

For shops that want to help their customers stay on top of Apple software updates without forcing those updates to be applied, there is a convenient URL that can be used:

macappstore://showUpdatesPage

When this URL is called from the command line using the open command, the following actions take place:

  1. The App Store application launches
  2. The Updates page loads.
  3. The Mac automatically checks for Apple OS updates and updates for applications purchased through the Mac App Store (MAS).

The relevant command is shown below and can be run without root privileges:

open macappstore://showUpdatesPage

For folks using Jamf Pro (the management solution formerly known as Casper), this command can be leveraged to provide a way for customers to easily check for Apple and MAS software updates on their own schedule. For more details, see below the jump.

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