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Archive for the ‘Apple File System’ Category

APFS encryption status check script

November 13, 2017 1 comment

As part of working Apple File System, I’ve developed a script which is designed to check and report the status of encrypted Apple File System (APFS) drives. Currently, here’s what the script is detecting and reporting:

It first checks to see if a Mac is running 10.13.x or higher. If the Mac is question is running 10.13.x or higher, the script reports if it is using encryption on an APFS drive and gives the encryption or decryption status.

If encrypted, the following message is displayed:

FileVault is On.

Screen Shot 2017 11 12 at 8 38 08 PM

 

If not encrypted, the following message is displayed:

FileVault is Off.

Screen Shot 2017 11 12 at 8 43 07 PM

If encrypting, the following message is displayed:

Encryption in progress:

How much has been encrypted is also displayed.

Screen Shot 2017 11 12 at 8 08 30 PM

 

If decrypting, the following message is displayed without quotes:

Decryption in progress:

How much has been decrypted is also displayed.

Screen Shot 2017 11 12 at 8 38 48 PM

 

 

 

If run on a drive which is not using APFS, the following message is displayed:

Unable to display encryption status for filesystems other than APFS.

Screen Shot 2017 11 12 at 8 44 11 PM

 

The script is available below and here on my GitHub repository:

https://github.com/rtrouton/rtrouton_scripts/tree/master/rtrouton_scripts/check_apfs_encryption

I’ve also built a Jamf Pro Extension Attribute:

https://github.com/rtrouton/rtrouton_scripts/tree/master/rtrouton_scripts/Casper_Extension_Attributes/check_apfs_encryption

Session videos from Jamf Nation User Conference 2017 now available

November 10, 2017 1 comment

Jamf has posted the session videos for from JAMF Nation User Conference 2017, including the video for my Apple File System session.

For those interested, all of the JNUC 2017 session videos are available on YouTube. For convenience, I’ve linked my session here.

Unlock an encrypted APFS boot drive using Disk Utility

November 4, 2017 1 comment

In the event that you need to unlock an unbootable boot drive using Apple File System (APFS) encryption, it’s possible to do so using Disk Utility and one of the following authentication credentials:

  1. The password to a FileVault-enabled account on the drive
  2. A personal recovery key

For more details, see below the jump.

Read more…

Unlock or decrypt an encrypted APFS boot drive from the command line

November 4, 2017 2 comments

As part of working with Apple File System (APFS) volumes, it may be necessary to decrypt a boot drive using APFS’s native encryption in order to fix a problem. To decrypt an encrypted APFS boot drive from the command line, you will need to do the following:

  1. Identify the relevant encrypted APFS volume
  2. Unlock the encrypted APFS volume
  3. Decrypt the encrypted APFS volume

For more details, see below the jump.

Read more…

Apple software updates creating APFS snapshots on macOS High Sierra

November 2, 2017 5 comments

As part of macOS High Sierra, Apple has added a new feature to Apple software updates which require a restart. When these updates are installed onto a boot drive which is using Apple File System (APFS), an APFS snapshot is automatically created on the boot drive prior to installing the software update. An APFS snapshot is a read-only copy of the state that the boot drive was in at a certain point in time, so it can be used as a backup in case something goes wrong with the update.


Update 11-2-2017: Apple has a KBase article which references this behavior:

https://support.apple.com/HT204015

The KBase article notes that a snapshot is made before macOS updates are made, which may mean that not all updates that require a restart will generate a snapshot.


 

In the event that the Apple software update causes post-installation issues, you can boot to Recovery HD and use the Time Machine restore functions available in Recovery to access the snapshot and restore the affected drive to the state it was in before the software update was installed.

Screen Shot 2017 11 01 at 9 37 51 PM

Something to be aware of is that this functionality does not apply to all Apple software updates. Instead, the automated snapshot creation appears to be specifically tied to Apple’s macOS updates.

The automated snapshot creation process does not require Time Machine to be configured for the Mac in question and a separate Time Machine backup drive is not needed. The snapshot is stored on the affected boot drive and does not require anything other than sufficient free space on the boot drive to store the snapshot. For more details, see below the jump.

Read more…

Slides from the “APFS and the Jamf Admin” session at Jamf Nation Conference 2017

October 25, 2017 1 comment

For those who wanted a copy of my APFS talk at Jamf Nation Conference 2017, here are links to the slides in PDF and Keynote format.

PDF – http://tinyurl.com/jnuc2017pdf

Keynote – http://tinyurl.com/jnuc2017key

Resizing a macOS VM’s APFS boot drive to use all available disk space

October 18, 2017 1 comment

A while back, I wrote a post on how to resize the boot drive of an existing virtual machine. However, that guidance only applies to a boot drive that uses HFS+ for its filesystem.

Now that Apple File System (APFS) is available and the default file system on macOS High Sierra, a different procedure must be used in order to resize the APFS-formatted boot drive of an existing virtual machine. For more details, see below the jump.

Read more…

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