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Archive for November 4, 2017

Implementing log rotation for the Jamf Infrastructure Manager logs on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

November 4, 2017 Leave a comment

A while back, I had set up the Jamf Infrastructure Manager (JIM) in a VM running Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) to provide a way for a Jamf Pro server hosted outside a company‚Äôs network to be able to talk to an otherwise inaccessible Active Directory domain. The JIM software has been running fine since I configured it, but I recently needed to take a look at the JIM logs as part of diagnosing another issue.

For those not familiar with the JIM software, it has several log files and those logs are available in the following location on RHEL:

/var/log/jamf-im-launcher.log
/var/log/jamf-im.log
/var/log/jamf-im-pre-enroll.log

Screen shot 2017 04 29 at 5 32 52 pm

When I checked the logs, I noticed that /var/log/jamf-im.log had grown to almost 500 MBs in size.

Considering this log is a plaintext file, that’s a big log file and it seemingly had been not been rotated or otherwise changed since I first installed the JIM software. To help make sure that the host VM would not eventually run out of space because of this growing log file, I needed to implement log rotation for the JIM logs. For more details, see below the jump.

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Unlock an encrypted APFS boot drive using Disk Utility

November 4, 2017 1 comment

In the event that you need to unlock an unbootable boot drive using Apple File System (APFS) encryption, it’s possible to do so using Disk Utility and one of the following authentication credentials:

  1. The password to a FileVault-enabled account on the drive
  2. A personal recovery key

For more details, see below the jump.

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Unlock or decrypt an encrypted APFS boot drive from the command line

November 4, 2017 1 comment

As part of working with Apple File System (APFS) volumes, it may be necessary to decrypt a boot drive using APFS’s native encryption in order to fix a problem. To decrypt an encrypted APFS boot drive from the command line, you will need to do the following:

  1. Identify the relevant encrypted APFS volume
  2. Unlock the encrypted APFS volume
  3. Decrypt the encrypted APFS volume

For more details, see below the jump.

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