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Firefox 31 allows access on non-Windows platforms to Sharepoint and IIS sites using HTTPS

July 22, 2014 1 comment

As part of Firefox 31’s release, Mozilla made a change to enable support for NT LAN Manager version 1 (NTLMv1) network authentication when connecting to sites that are using HTTPS to allow encrypted communication via SSL between Firefox 31 and the website in question. This is to address the change made in Firefox 30, which disabled support for NT LAN Manager version 1 (NTLMv1) network authentication for sites using either HTTP and HTTPS.

NTLMv1 authentication to sites using HTTP is still disabled by default. For more information on why HTTPS is now enabled while HTTP remains disabled, this Mozilla bug report discusses the issue.

A way to tell if the NTLMv1-using site you’re trying to access is using HTTP or HTTPS is to check the connection address. If it begins with https://, you should be OK. If it begins with http:// , Firefox 31 will still block NTLMv1 authentication.

If you need to enable NTLMv1 authentication for an HTTP site that uses NTLMv1 authentication, Mozilla has provided a workaround to non-Windows users of Firefox, in the form of a setting that can be toggled to allow NTLMv1 authentication. This workaround should allow Mac and Linux users to continue using NTLMv1 authentication on HTTP sites, which will allow access again to SharePoint-based or IIS-backed web applications. For those folks who need it, I have the workaround documented here.

Upgrading from Casper 8.73 to 9.32

June 28, 2014 4 comments

Since Casper 9.x was first released, I’ve been preparing for my shop’s own upgrade from Casper 8.x to 9.x. As of the morning of Saturday, June 28th, those preparations have ended with my shop’s successful upgrade to Casper 9.32. When I mentioned this on Twitter, I heard from a few folks who mentioned that they were planning to also do this in the near future and @theycallmebauer asked if I was going to post about my experience.

Screen Shot 2014-06-28 at 3.48.47 PM

I thought that was a good idea, so please see below the jump for the details.

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Firefox 30 blocks access on non-Windows platforms to Sharepoint and IIS sites

June 13, 2014 23 comments

As part of Firefox 30’s release, Mozilla made a change to disable support for NT LAN Manager version 1 (NTLMv1) network authentication. This change affects sites using Microsoft’s SharePoint or IIS services. The Windows version of Firefox 30 should switch to using NTLMv2 authentication automatically, but NTLMv2 is not supported by Firefox on non-Windows platforms.



Update – 7-22-2014: Mozilla has released Firefox 31, which now allows access on non-Windows platforms to Sharepoint and IIS sites using HTTPS. For more details, see this post.


The result for non-Windows platforms is that access may be blocked when Firefox 30 users try to access those kinds of sites.

Screen Shot 2014-06-13 at 1.12.57 PM

Mozilla has provided a workaround to non-Windows users of Firefox, in the form of a setting that can be toggled to allow NTLMv1 authentication. This workaround should allow Mac and Linux users to continue using NTLMv1 authentication, which will allow access again to SharePoint-based or IIS-backed web applications. For more details, see below the jump.

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Using /etc/auto_home on Mavericks to mount shares under /home

April 6, 2014 2 comments

One of my users at work asked me recently about symlinking his network home folder to /home on his Mac running 10.9.2 and wanted to check to see if it was safe to do so.

In this case, the person in question works on both Fedora Linux, where his network home directory was mounted as /home/username, and on OS X. His network home directory was available via SMB on his Mac as smb://servername/home$/username. He wanted to be able to mount smb://servername/home$/username to /home/username on his Mac, so that it matched the mountpoint of his network home on his Fedora box.

At the time, here’s what I knew about /home:

1. Nothing appears to be stored in it by default

2. It’s listed in /etc/auto_master as a mountpoint

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3. Time Machine does not back it up

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Fixing Casper’s MySQL database with mysqlcheck

February 1, 2014 Leave a comment

After some VMware host issues that were out of my control, the RHEL VMs that my production and test Casper servers are hosted on were unexpectedly rebooted a couple of times. When I checked the VMs afterwards, everything appeared to be OK. I figured that I had been fortunate, until my Casper test server sent me the nightly “Successful backup of the Casper database” email and my production server didn’t.

Uh oh.

When I checked the directory when my production server stores its backups of the Casper database, there wasn’t a backup from the night before. I immediately launched the JAMF Database Utility application and had it make a backup of the production database. A task which normally would take 10 minutes or so now took 40 minutes.

Not good.

To lighten the load on the database, I went into the JSS and had it manually flush all but the last week’s worth of logs (I normally retain 30 days of logs.)

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Once the log flush had completed, I then rebooted the box. On reboot, the JSS initialized and then hung halfway through the JSS startup process.

Screen Shot 2014-02-01 at 4.53.48 PM

Really not good.

For the details of how I fixed this, see below the jump.

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Categories: Casper, Linux

Migrating Macs from one OpenLDAP domain to another OpenLDAP domain

November 22, 2013 Leave a comment

A while ago, I needed to script a method for binding Macs running 10.6.x and later to our Linux-based OpenLDAP server. Recently, we needed to move our OpenLDAP domain to a different OpenLDAP domain as part of a larger directory service migration project. A small part of that project was moving the LDAP-bound Macs to the new LDAP domain, preferably with as little disruption as possible.

One enormous advantage I had with this LDAP move was the following:

All UIDs, GIDs, usernames, passwords and group names were going to be identical between the two LDAP domains.

As a consequence, I would not need to do any permissions changes, rebuild accounts, make sure people got new passwords or a host of other things normally associated with a directory service change. My task was essentially to tell the Macs “Stop talking to the OpenLDAP service at that address, start talking to this other OpenLDAP service at this address”

As part of the project, I also wanted to accommodate two separate Active Directory domains differently. I wasn’t binding to AD as part of this process, but if a particular Mac was bound to Domain A, I wanted to unbind. If a Mac was bound to Domain B, I didn’t want to unbind but I did want the new LDAP server to be the primary authentication source.

Using my previous OpenLDAP binding script as a starting point, I was able to build a script to handle moving our Macs without downtime or account changes. See below the jump for details.

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Expanding available disk space on JAMF’s NetSUS VM appliance

November 16, 2013 1 comment

Thanks to Allister, I ran across this NetSUS-related feature request at JAMF Nation. While the feature request makes sense in the context of the requester’s shop, it is possible to resize the NetSUS appliance to give it additional space.

The steps should be reasonably similar for each virtualization solution, but see below the jump for how to do this with VMware Fusion 6.x.

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Updating Red Hat Enterprise Linux and MySQL for Casper JSS server running on Linux

October 9, 2013 3 comments

In my own shop, I’m currently running Casper 8.x on a Red Hat Enterprise Linux server. The server had been set up initially with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.0 and MySQL 5.1.47 and it had stayed there for a while. However, I looked ahead to Casper 9.x and saw the following versions of MySQL were now listed as being required:

MySQL Enterprise Edition 5.5 or later, or MySQL Community Server 5.5 or later

I’m still running Casper 8.x, but I wanted to get ahead of the curve and not have to deal with a MySQL upgrade at the same time as a future Casper 9.x upgrade. Thanks to the Linux folks at my workplace, I was able to do so with a minimum of hassle. See below the jump for the details.
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Categories: Casper, JSS, Linux

Uninstalling Casper on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

September 24, 2013 Leave a comment

I recently had to roll my Casper test server back, as I had been testing Casper 9.x but needed to verify something worked in Casper 8.x. Since I hadn’t found a good knowledge base article on JAMF Nation for uninstalling Casper’s JSS from a Red Hat Enterprise Linux server, I asked JAMF Support how to do this. Here’s the procedure I used, based on their response:

Note: This procedure should only be used if you need to completely uninstall your Casper JSS. It removes all certificates, databases and anything else stored in your JSS.

1. SSH into the RHEL server as my user account.

2. su into the root account on the server by running the following command:

su root

3. Stop JAMF’s Tomcat by running the following command:

/etc/rc.d/init.d/jamf.tomcat7 stop

4. Delete the jss directory from /usr/local by running the following command:

rm -rf /usr/local/jss

Once /usr/local/jss was removed, I needed to remove the JSS’s MySQL database in order to complete the uninstall. Here’s the procedure I used:

5. Run the following command to get a MySQL prompt:

mysql

6. From the mysql> prompt, run the following command to remove the existing database:

mysql> drop database jamfsoftware;

7. Exit out of MySQL with the following command:

mysql> exit;

At this point, the JAMF-provided parts of the JSS were all removed. I hadn’t removed anything from my JSS’s file share, so all my installers and deployable scripts were intact. I then rebooted, just to make sure no stray processes remained before I tried reinstalling Casper 8.x.

Once the server was back up, I ran the following procedure to prepare the server for re-installing Casper 8.x.:

1. SSH into the RHEL server as my user account.

2. su into the root account on the server by running the following command:

su root

3. Run the following command to get a MySQL prompt:

mysql

4. From the mysql> prompt, run the following command to create a new empty jamfsoftware database for the JSS:

mysql> create database jamfsoftware;

5. Exit out of MySQL with the following command:

mysql> exit;

With the new jamfsoftware database created in MySQL on my test server, I was then ready to reinstall Casper 8.x.

Categories: Casper, JSS, Linux

First look at Crypt

December 31, 2012 4 comments

Since the release of Google’s Cauliflower Vest, one of the wishlist items that a number of Mac admins have wanted is to use Cauliflower Vest’s capabilities without needing to use Google App Engine as the server backend. Crypt, a new open-source project being developed by Graham Gilbert, looks like a step in the right direction. See below the jump for details.

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